Monday, October 24, 2011

My Review of As Silver Refined

As Silver Refined

Written by: Kay Arthur
Published by: Waterbrook Press

I had heard Kay Arthur’s radio programs many times, but had never read any of her books, so when I got the chance to read this one I thought I would give it a try.

This is a book about a variety of topics, all with the purpose of “refining” us.

What I liked:

I like how Kay Arthur shares quite a bit of Bible passages right in the book.

What I didn’t like:

Kay Arthur speaks of her divorce - before she was a Christian. She mentions that her and her husband had a fight that ended with him being abusive, and that she left after that fight… which makes sense to me. But then she states that God wouldn’t have wanted her to leave her husband. She goes on to say that her husband committed suicide a short time later, and it sounds as if she blames herself for his death. I don’t think that God would want us to live in an abusive relationship, and I don’t think that any book should ever suggest that we should as this one did - especially since Kay was the mother of young children at that time. This whole situation was enough for me to decide that I would not recommend this book to anyone.

Kay Arthur talks about depression as if it is a spiritual problem, not a medical problem - something that can be (and has been) argued about - something I disagree with.

This book was hard to read, and I had to force myself to finish it - taking much longer than I normally would for a book of it’s size.

My conclusion:

I disagreed with Kay Arthur on a few different points, I had difficulty getting through the book, I don’t recommend this book.

I give As Silver Refined 1 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from WaterBrook Press through Blogging for Books. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Roadside Assistance

Written by: Amy Clipston
Published by: Zondervan

Emily Claire Curtis is a car loving teenage girl with the weight of the world on her shoulders. She lost her mom just months ago, and now is “forced” to move (along with her dad) into her rich aunt and uncle’s house - no longer having a garage of her own to work in whenever she wants. Emily struggles with her faith, and with her relationships with her relatives and friends.

Who the book is for:

As an adult I found I enjoyed this book, though I think teens (the target audience) would enjoy it more.

What I liked:

I liked that Emily had a unique hobby, fixing cars.

This book kept me interested.

What I didn’t like:

The parts of the book where Emily wrote in her journal to her mom were a bit boring and repetitious of what had already been said in the book.

My conclusion:

This is a good book, I enjoyed reading it.

I give Roadside Assistance 5 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from Zondervan. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

My Review of A Heart for Freedom

A Heart for Freedom
Written by: Chai Ling
Published by: Tyndale

Since childhood I have known that China was place where humans were not given all of the rights that they deserve. When I was young I joined my family in boycotting products that were made in China, but eventually I stopped caring and just started buying whatever - it is so hard to find things that aren’t made in China these days! Recently I have again been hearing of how China needs to change, and I received this book at the perfect time to go hand in hand with what I am hearing… China needs to change.

I must admit, before reading this book, I had never even heard about the Tiananmen Square Massacre.

Who the book is for:

Everyone should read this book, if you want to lose your any respect you may have for China. Anyone who wants to learn some history about China would be interested in this book.

What I liked:

I love how Chai is so open and honest in her sharing.

This book was interesting, and I didn’t have to force myself to read it.

Informative.

What I didn’t like:

There’s not much I didn’t like about this book.

My conclusion:

I’m glad I got the chance to read this book, and to learn more about China’s extreme government. I hope that I can find some way to help those in China, perhaps through Chai Ling’s organization All Girls Allowed.

I give A Heart For Freedom 5 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from Tyndale. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.