Tuesday, April 30, 2013

My Review of Willing to Walk on Water


Written by: Caroline Barnett
Published by: Tyndale

I was excited to read Willing to Walk on Water because I could use the motivation to step out in faith and make a difference in the lives of those around me. This book was as inspirational as I expected it to be.



Who the book is for:

Christians, especially those Christians who would like to make a change in the world (which should be all of us.)

What I liked:

Very encouraging to get out there and make a change in the world.

Gives real ways that you can help others.

Enjoyable to read, with stories from real people.

What I didn’t like:

My only complaint is that the chapters are a bit long, so it was hard to read a whole one in a sitting.

My conclusion:

I really enjoyed this book and was encouraged by it.

I give Willing to Walk on Water 5 out of 5 stars.

*I will be keeping my copy of this book to read again and again.

I received this book free to review from Tyndale. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Monday, April 29, 2013

*Giveaway and Review - Hey God, I've Got Some Guy...


*I also have another giveaway going on, here!

Written by: Troy Schmidt
Published by: Cory Jones

I have to admit that the look of this book didn’t attract me at first, but I enjoy kids’ books, so I decided to receive it for review anyway.



The story:

This is the story of Jonah from the Bible, told from the whales perspective, which is actually kind of cute and a new way to look at the story.

The illustrations:

Are colorful and very simple.

How strong is the book?

This is a hardcover book and appears to be fairly strong.

Who the book is for:

I would probably recommend this book for ages four to eight.

What I liked:

The book is colorful.

This is a new way to look at the story.

What I didn’t like:

The writing wasn’t the best.

The book just looks cheap overall.

The title is extremely long.

My conclusion:

This is a fairly cute book.

I give Hey God, I’ve Got Some Guy Named Jonah In My Stomach And I Think I’m Going To Throw Up 3 out of 5 stars.

You can win a copy of this book for yourself!


a Rafflecopter giveaway



I received this book free to review from Fly By Promotions. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

My Review of Wishing on Willows


Written by: Wishing on Willows
Published by: WaterBrook Press

Despite the fact that the cover of Wishing on Willows did not interest me at all, the story did, and that is why I picked it up.

Robin Price is a widow with a three year old son, who is trying to keep her struggling café going. When Ian McKay, a divorced and hurting developer, comes to town and wants to destroy Robin’s café to building condos, of course that upsets Robin. In the end, Robin must trust God over her own plans.



Who the book is for:

Contemporary fiction readers, especially women.

What I liked:

Has heart.

Some parts are interesting and enjoyable to read…

What I didn’t like:

…some parts are a bit boring.

My conclusion:

Overall, this is a pretty good book.

I give Wishing on Willows 4 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from Blogging for Books. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Monday, April 22, 2013

My Review of Swept Away


Written by: Mary Connealy
Published by: Bethany House

Pretty soon I am going to have to stop claiming that I don’t like historical fiction, as I keep stumbling across books that I do enjoy. Swept Away is one of them.

Ruthy MacNeil is separated from the people who she calls family, while attempting to cross a river with their wagon train. She is rescued by Luke Stone, a man on a mission to take back his family’s home. The two of their share of fights, but in the end they must help each other.



Who the book is for:

Mainly Christian women - historical fiction lovers or not.

What I liked:

Good story.

Interesting.

Funny.

Has heart.

What I didn’t like:

There is nothing that I didn’t like about this book.

My conclusion:

I really enjoyed this book.

I give Swept Away 5 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from Bethany House. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.


Friday, April 19, 2013

My Review of Firefly Island


Written by: Lisa Wingate
Published by: Bethany House

I received Firefly Island free to review from Bethany House, thinking that the story sounded like something that I would enjoy.

Mallory Hale gets married and leaves Capital Hill behind, in trade for a small town of Moses Lake, Texas. There she must face pests in her home, her husband’s busy schedule, and a bit of mystery - an entire new life for her.



Who the book is for:

Contemporary fiction lovers, especially women. Those who enjoy more detailed books.

What I liked:

There were small parts of the story that were enjoyable to read and funny.

What I didn’t like:

But overall the story was pretty boring.

My conclusion:

I really did not love this book at all.

I give Firefly Island 2 out of 5 stars.

*I will not be keeping my copy of this book.

I received this book free to review from Bethany House. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

My Review of Learning to Love


Written by: Heidi and Rolland Baker
Published by: Chosen

I was really excited to receive Learning to Love to review, because I thought it was going to be sort of a call for me to get out and love those around me - and I could use the push… but, as you’ll see in my conclusion, that wasn’t really it.



Who the book is for:

Christians, teens and adults, specifically, men and women.

What I liked:

The chapters are reasonably short and therefore easy to get through.

Each chapter ends with a Bible verse.

The Bakers seem like really nice people.

What I didn’t like:

Parts are a bit boring.

Wasn’t what I expected.

My conclusion:

To me, this book read as a missionary newsletter, not the call to love that I thought it would be. The Bakers simply shared stories of their mission work - exciting as those stories were, it wasn’t what I was expecting.

I give Learning to Love 3 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from Bethany House. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.


Monday, April 8, 2013

My Review of The House that Love Built


Written by: Beth Wiseman
Published by: Thomas Nelson

From the moment that I first read about The House that Love Built, I knew that I wanted to read it. I was so excited when I was able to receive it to review from BookSneeze.

This is the story of Brooke Holloway, a widow who is raising two young children alone. Owen Saunders, who is bitter about his recent divorce. Hunter, a troubled and abused teenager. Patsy and Harold, an older couple who are back together after years apart - much to their daughter’s disapproval.



Who the book is for:

Contemporary fiction readers, like myself, specifically women.

What I liked:

I loved the story - it combined everything that I love in a story: family, a troubled teen, parent/child relationships…

It was funny - so many parts of this book made me laugh.

The entire book was enjoyable to read.

What I didn’t like:

Nothing!

My conclusion:

I really enjoyed this book.

I give The House that Love Built 5 out of 5 stars.

*I will be keeping this book, and have already allowed my sister to borrow it.

I received this book free to review from BookSneeze. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.


Thursday, April 4, 2013

My Review of A Sudden Glory


Written by: Sharon Jaynes
Published by: Multnomah

I chose to read and review A Sudden Glory because I sometimes feel like I am lacking something in my faith and relationship with Jesus.

This book is about living and breathing God, experiencing him as more than just a religion.



Who the book is for:

Christians, specifically - but not limited to - women.

What I liked:

Inspired me to want more from my relationship with God.

Shares stories to keep the reader interested.

What I didn’t like:

The chapters are long and can get hard to push through.

My conclusion:

This book is a good read and inspiring to all Christians.

I give A Sudden Glory 4 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from Blogging for Books. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Monday, April 1, 2013

My Review of The Guardian




This week, the Christian Fiction Blog Alliance is introducing The Guardian Bethany House Publishers (March 26, 2013) by Beverly Lewis


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:




Beverly's first venture into adult fiction is the best-selling trilogy, The Heritage of Lancaster County, including The Shunning, a suspenseful saga of Katie Lapp, a young Amish woman drawn to the modern world by secrets from her past. The book is loosely based on the author's maternal grandmother, Ada Ranck Buchwalter, who left her Old Order Mennonite upbringing to marry a Bible College student. One Amish-country newspaper claimed Beverly's work to be "a primer on Lancaster County folklore" and offers "an insider's view of Amish life."

Booksellers across the country, and around the world, have spread the word of Beverly's tender tales of Plain country life. A clerk in a Virginia bookstore wrote, "Beverly's books have a compelling freshness and spark. You just don't run across writing like that every day. I hope she'll keep writing stories about the Plain people for a long, long time."

A member of the National League of American Pen Women, as well as a Distinguished Alumnus of Evangel University, Lewis has written over 80 books for children, youth, and adults, many of them award-winning. She and her husband, David, make their home in Colorado, where they enjoy hiking, biking, and spending time with their family. They are also avid musicians and fiction "book worms."        

ABOUT THE BOOK



When schoolteacher Jodi Winfield goes for a morning run, the last thing she expects is to find a disheveled little girl all alone on the side of the Pennsylvania road, clad only in her undergarments, her chubby cheeks streaked with tears. Jodi takes the preschooler home with her, intending to find out where she belongs. But Jodi is mystified when no one seems to know of a missing child, and the girl herself is no help, since she can't speak a word of English. It's as if the child appeared out of nowhere.


As the days pass, Jodi becomes increasingly attached to the mysterious girl, yet she is no closer to learning her identity. Then an unexpected opportunity brings Jodi to Hickory Hollow--and into the cloistered world of the Lancaster Old Order Amish. Might the answers lie there?


If you would like to read teh first chapter of The Guardian, go HERE.





Written by: Beverly Lewis
Published by: Bethany House

I received an advance reader copy of this book through CFBA.

I’ve never been a big Beverly Lewis fan, as I’m not a big fan of the Amish or reading about them - but The Guardian sounded interesting to me because it included the story of a non-Amish.

Who the book is for:

Those who enjoy Amish fiction. Beverly Lewis fans. Specifically women.

What I liked:

The story was interesting.

I like how this book combines the stories of both Amish and non-Amish.

What I didn’t like:

Parts were a bit boring.

My conclusion:

Overall, I thought this book was a decent read.

I give The Guardian 4 out of 5 stars.

I received this book free to review from CFBA. The opinions expressed in this review are my true thoughts and feeling regarding this book. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.